Dharma school students research, create signs about frogs

PUPILS from Daylesford Dharma School have designed and installed a number of signs with information pertaining to the types of frogs that can be found in the Daylesford region. 

The project, an initiative of the Friends of Cornish Hill, who secured funding for the project, aligns with the Dhama School’s dedication to the ongoing care and action for the natural environment.

The pupils researched and painted signs about the frogs that can be found in the region on information boards built by Daylesford Men’s Shed before installing them along Smith’s Creek on Daylesford’s Cornish Hill. 

Margaret Thomas, of the Friends of Cornish Hill group, said there were three types of frogs which could be found in the region, including the Eastern Banjo Frog, Common Froglet and Brown Tree Frog.

“We know these can all be found around here as they are indigenous to central Victoria but we haven’t actually done a survey yet.”

FROGS: Prep pupils Aurora and Luna with their information board. Photo: Kate Healy

FROGS: Prep pupils Aurora and Luna with their information board. Photo: Kate Healy

She said frogs were a difficult species to survey.

“We are always trying to identify the species out here and how effective the habitat is now that we have worked to restore it,” she said.

“We have evidence that we do have frogs here, which is an indicator of good water health.”

Ms Thomas said Cornish Hill was an educational resource, due to its historical, cultural and environmental significance, located in the heart of Daylesford, so the group liked to engage with schools. 

“What we try to do is create opportunities which change misconceptions about the environment and also to create lasting memories that students can take into their adult lives with the hope of instilling understanding of how important the environment is.”

She said one misconception was around bats – that they are a carrier of disease – but in fact, they are important pollinators. 

We have evidence that we do have frogs here, which is an indicator of good water health.

Margaret Thomas

Learning Manager at the Dharma School, Tanya Wiggins, said the project was a great learning opportunity for the pupils. 

“They looked at the distribution maps of Victoria and where Daylesford is situated within that map. It has also been an opportunity for us to come to Cornish Hill and learn more about frogs and what we can do to help the environment around us. 

“Being more action focused really fits in with the Dharma philosophy,” she said.