Seven nurses are commemorated in Kingston Avenue of Honour for their service in WWI

With Armistice Day just around the corner, it is a fitting time to remember those who fought for their country during WWI, including the many women.

BRAVERY: Nurse Ella Madoline Redman, of Smeaton, pre World War One. She used the skills she learned during training at Creswick Hospital during the war.

BRAVERY: Nurse Ella Madoline Redman, of Smeaton, pre World War One. She used the skills she learned during training at Creswick Hospital during the war.

The women who served during the war are too often forgotten among the camaraderie and hero’s tales of the men. 

Margaret Fullwood, of Creswick Museum, has researched and recorded the stories of the seven women who are commemorated in the Kingston Avenue of Honour. 

She says these women weren’t treated as well as their male counterparts, and were given little or no support upon their return to Australian soil. 

This is the story of Smeaton’s Ella Madoline Redman. Born in 1887 to Alfred John and Barbara Redman, she trained as a nurse at Creswick Hospital for three years before moving to the metropolis to further qualify herself. 

On August 4, 1915, she embarked from Australia as part of the Australian Army Nursing Service.

She reported for duty at the 3rd Australian General Hospital on Lemnos Island, Greece, on September 4, where she worked as a nurse assisting to wounded troops from Gallipoli.

Abroad, Sister Redman befriended an Albert William Savage, a photographer by trade; she kept an album of 70 odd photographs recording her time in the war until her death. 

Ms Fullwood said Sister Redman had her photographs developed in the X-Ray unit of the hospital.

On January 27, 1916, Sister Redman travelled on the ‘Oxfordshire’ with many sick and wounded from Mudros Bay to Egypt.

She was admitted to the 3rd Australia General Hospital (AGH) in Abbassia with dyspepsia for four days in August. 

A month later, she joined the RMT Karoola at Alexandria before being transferred to the 3rd AGH stationed at Brighton, England, where she was granted leave for 23 days in February of 1917.

Upon her return to duty, she was sent to join the AGH at Abberville in France.

On March 22, 1918, Sister Redman was one of five staff nurses who were detached from the No 3. Australian General Hospital to the 38th CCS at the moment of German advance. 

During the spring offences, as the Germans advanced on Amiens and Paris, the nurses worked in horrendous conditions with a lack of medical supplies and basic food and water. 

Sister Redman’s full story and artifacts from her time in the war can be viewed at Creswick Museum until November 11.